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Explore Oban

Named the unofficial capital of the West Highlands, Oban is a bustling town filled with Scottish culture and beautiful scenery. Begin your adventure today and discover one of Scotland’s best kept secrets. Breathe in the refreshing Scottish air, taste local produce, and explore the awe-inspiring views across Oban Harbour.

The port of Oban Scotland early evening

McCaig’s Tower

McCaig’s Tower is a prominent tower on Battery Hill overlooking the town of Oban in Argyll, Scotland. It is built of Bonawe granite taken from the quarries across Airds Bay, on Loch Etive, fraom Muckairn, with a circumference of about 200 metres with two-tiers of 94 lancet arches.

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McCaig’s Tower is a prominent tower on Battery Hill overlooking the town of Oban in Argyll, Scotland. It is built of Bonawe granite taken from the quarries across Airds Bay, on Loch Etive, fraom Muckairn, with a circumference of about 200 metres with two-tiers of 94 lancet arches.
McCaig’s Tower is a prominent tower on Battery Hill overlooking the town of Oban in Argyll, Scotland. It is built of Bonawe granite taken from the quarries across Airds Bay, on Loch Etive, fraom Muckairn, with a circumference of about 200 metres with two-tiers of 94 lancet arches.
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Oban Distillery

Oban distillery is situated right in the heart of Oban town centre. When travelling from the north follow the A85 in to Oban town centre. The Distillery is situated on Stafford Street opposite the North Pier. Those coming from the South will enter Oban town on the A816 from Lochgilphead and again it is necessary to follow town centre signage. Street parking and off site car parking are available in close proximity of the distillery- local charges apply.Oban distillery is situated right in the heart of Oban town centre. When travelling from the north follow the A85 in to Oban town centre. The Distillery is situated on Stafford Street opposite the North Pier. Those coming from the South will enter Oban town on the A816 from Lochgilphead and again it is necessary to follow town centre signage. Street parking and off site car parking are available in close proximity of the distillery- local charges apply.

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Oban distillery is situated right in the heart of Oban town centre. When travelling from the north follow the A85 in to Oban town centre. The Distillery is situated on Stafford Street opposite the North Pier. Those coming from the South will enter Oban town on the A816 from Lochgilphead and again it is necessary to follow town centre signage. Street parking and off site car parking are available in close proximity of the distillery- local charges apply.Oban distillery is situated right in the heart of Oban town centre. When travelling from the north follow the A85 in to Oban town centre. The Distillery is situated on Stafford Street opposite the North Pier. Those coming from the South will enter Oban town on the A816 from Lochgilphead and again it is necessary to follow town centre signage. Street parking and off site car parking are available in close proximity of the distillery- local charges apply.

Dunstaffnage Castle and Chapel

Dunstaffnage Castle is a partially ruined castle in Argyll and Bute, western Scotland. It lies 3 miles N.N.E. of Oban, situated on a platform of conglomerate rock on a promontory at the south-west of the entrance to Loch Etive, and is surrounded on three sides by the sea.

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The MacDougalls
The castle itself was built in the second quarter of the 13th century, as the seat of Duncan MacDougall, Lord of Lorn and grandson of Somerled.[6] He had also travelled to Rome in 1237, and was the founder of nearby Ardchattan Priory.[7] Duncan’s son Ewen MacDougall inherited his father’s title in the 1240s, and expanded the MacDougall influence, styling himself “King of the Isles”. It is probable that Ewen built the three round towers onto the castle, and constructed and enlarged the hall inside.[8]

Following Alexander III’s repulse of the Norse influence in Argyll, the MacDougalls backed the Scottish monarchy, and Ewen’s son Alexander was made the first sheriff of Argyll in 1293. However, they supported the Balliol side during the Wars of Scottish Independence which broke out a few years later. Robert Bruce defeated the Clan MacDougall at the Battle of the Pass of Brander in 1308 or 1309, and after a brief siege, took control of Dunstaffnage Castle.

Royal fortress
Now a Crown property, Dunstaffnage was controlled by a series of keepers. James I seized the castle in 1431, following the Battle of Inverlochy, as his enemies were hiding inside. In 1455 James Douglas, 9th Earl of Douglas stayed at Dunstaffnage, on his way to treat with John MacDonald, Lord of the Isles.[9] This followed James II’s attack on Douglas power, and led to the signing of the Treaty of Westminster-Ardtornish. A later keeper, John Stewart of Lorn, was a rival of Alan MacDougall, and was stabbed by his supporters on his way to his marriage at Dunstaffnage Chapel in 1463, although he survived long enough to make his vows. Although MacDougall took the castle, he was ousted by James III, who granted Dunstaffnage to Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll in 1470.[10]

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